International

Riot police and anti-government demonstrators have clashed for a second night in the Lebanese capital, Beirut, leaving dozens of people wounded.

Protesters threw bottles and fireworks at police officers, who responded with tear gas and water cannon.

Meanwhile, Interior Minister Raya el-Hassan ordered an inquiry into Saturday's fierce crackdown by security forces that left dozens more wounded.

Protests over economic mismanagement by the ruling elite began in October.

The clashes are some of the worst violence since the largely peaceful protests started. They triggered the resignation of the Prime Minister, Saad al-Hariri, but talks to form a new government are deadlocked.

On Monday, the Lebanese parliament will consider whom to nominate as prime minister, with Mr Hariri expected to return to the post.

Riot police and security forces were again deployed in large numbers on Sunday as thousands of protesters returned to the streets. Lebanon's Internal Security Forces said they fired tear gas after demonstrators pelted them with fireworks and stones.

The Lebanese Civil Defence said it had treated 46 people for injuries and taken 14 others to hospital, according to Reuters news agency.

A protester, Omar Abyad, a 25-year-old nurse who has been unemployed since he graduated two years ago, told Reuters: "They [security forces] attacked us in a barbaric way, as if we're not protesting for their sake, their children."

The interior minister demanded the security forces to open a "rapid and transparent" investigation into Saturday's violence but warned against "infiltrators" seeking to use protests to spark "confrontations".

International

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US special envoy Stephen Biegun has urged North Korea to come to the negotiating table, saying: "We are here, let's get this done."

His comments in Seoul come days after North Korea conducted missile tests at a satellite launch site.

North Korea has set an end-of-year deadline for the US to come up with a new denuclearisation deal that would involve significant sanctions relief.

It said the US could expect a "Christmas gift" if it did not comply.

Mr Biegun – the US special representative for North Korea – called Pyongyang's statements "hostile, negative and so unnecessary", adding that the US had a "goal… not a deadline".

He called for Pyongyang to enter talks with the US, saying to his North Korean counterparts: "It is time for us to do our jobs. Let's get this done. We are here and you know how to reach us."

US President Donald Trump has said he will not lift sanctions until North Korea fully abandons its nuclear programme.

North Korea said if the US did not make an acceptable offer, it would find a "new way".

What tests did North Korea carry out?

Pyongyang appears to have shut the door on further US talks, focusing instead on testing missiles.

International

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Protests over a controversial new law on migrants are raging across several Indian cities, prompting police to clash with demonstrators.

The new law entitles non-Muslim migrants from three Muslim-majority countries to citizenship if they are facing religious persecution.

Police used tear gas and detained protesters in the capital Delhi as buses were torched and roads blocked.

Protests have raged across northern and eastern India since the law was passed.

Internet services have been shut down in several cities where protests are taking place. Universities across the country have resumed demonstrations on Monday.

Some critics say the law is anti-Muslim, while others – especially in border regions – fear large-scale migration.

Six people have been killed in the five days of unrest.

Over the weekend, demonstrators in West Bengal blocked key national highways while in Assam, the state government briefly lifted a curfew to allow people to buy essential goods.

The UK, US and Canada have issued travel warnings for people visiting India's north-east, telling their citizens to "exercise caution" if travelling to the region.

International

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Top Democrats have urged Republicans to cross party lines and side with them in impeaching their own leader, US President Donald Trump.

Adam Schiff and Jerry Nadler, who are leading the Democratic push to impeach him, made their case days before the first full House vote.

Mr Trump poses a "clear and present danger" to democracy, said Mr Schiff.

Democrats control the House but are almost certain to lose in the Senate, which is in Republican hands.

Until now the Democrats have enjoyed a 36-seat lead over Republicans in the House but one of their representatives, Jeff Van Drew, opposes impeachment and is expected to switch parties soon.

Mr Van Drew met President Trump on Friday and has been praised by the president for his stance.

The case brought in the House accuses Mr Trump of soliciting a foreign country to help him politically, by trying to force Ukraine to launch a corruption investigation into his Democratic rival Joe Biden.

He is also accused of obstructing Congress by failing to co-operate with the House investigation.

Mr Trump denies wrongdoing. He has called the House investigation a "witch hunt" and predicted it will even benefit him in next year's presidential election.

International

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Police have clashed with demonstrators in parts of the Indian capital, Delhi, during protests over a controversial new law on migrants.

The new law entitles non-Muslim migrants from three Muslim-majority countries to citizenship if they are facing religious persecution.

Police used tear gas and truncheons against protesters as buses were torched and roads were blocked.

Protests have raged across north and east India since the law was passed.

Six people have been killed in the five days of unrest.

This weekend, demonstrators in West Bengal blocked key national highways while in Assam, the state government briefly lifted a curfew to allow people to buy essential goods.

The UK, US and Canada have issued travel warnings for people visiting India's north-east, telling their citizens to "exercise caution" if travelling to the region.

What happened in Delhi?

Students of the prestigious Jamia Millia Islamia university held a protest march which ended in clashes with the police.

It is still unclear who started the violence but stones were thrown at the police who retaliated with tear gas.

International

A minute's silence will be observed in New Zealand on Monday to mark one week since the deadly eruption of White Island volcano.

The tribute will be held at 14:11 local time (01:11 GMT), the exact moment of the eruption.

Sixteen deaths have been confirmed while two bodies are still missing, believed to be in the water off the island.

About 20 people remain in intensive care with severe burns.

On Sunday, teams returned to White Island, also known by its Maori name of Whakaari, and divers searched the water but, again, were unable to locate the missing bodies.

Depending on the weather, water searches could be resumed on Monday. "This is a difficult and ongoing task," Deputy Commissioner John Tims said in a statement, adding that police remained committed to retrieving the bodies.

On Instagram, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern paid tribute to "many people who did extraordinary things to save lives", saying: "Those who have been lost are now forever linked to New Zealand, and we will hold them close."

Ms Ardern, who visited some of the first responders last week, was expected to mark the minute's silence during her cabinet's weekly meeting.

What about the identification of the victims?

The identification process is being carried out in Auckland by experts including a pathologist, a forensic dentist and a fingerprint officer.

Three other victims were named by police on Sunday, including 32-year-old Karla Michelle Mathews, from Australia. The other two – 16-year-old Berend Hollander and his 13-year-old brother, Matthew – were US citizens and permanent Australian residents.

International

China's state broadcaster CCTV has removed Sunday's Arsenal-Manchester City game from its schedule after comments made by Gunners midfielder Mesut Ozil, state media has reported.

Ozil posted on social media about the treatment of Uighur Muslims in China.

Arsenal distanced the club from the German's views, saying it was "always apolitical as an organisation".

The Global Times described Ozil's comments as "false" and claimed he had "disappointed" football authorities.

In addition, the Chinese Football Association said Ozil's comments were "unacceptable" and had "hurt the feelings" of Chinese fans.

CCTV will now show Sunday's game between Tottenham and Wolves, instead of a live broadcast of Arsenal's home match with the reigning Premier League champions.

In his social media post Ozil, who is a Muslim, called Uighurs "warriors who resist persecution" and criticised both China and the silence of Muslims in response.

China has consistently denied mistreating Uighur Muslims in the country.

Rights groups say about a million people – mostly from the Muslim Uighur community – are thought to have been detained without trial in high-security prison camps.

China says they are being educated in "vocational training centres" to combat violent religious extremism.

International

The longest United Nations climate talks on record have finally ended in Madrid with a compromise deal.

Exhausted delegates reached agreement on the key question of increasing the global response to curbing carbon.

All countries will need to put new climate pledges on the table by the time of the next major conference in Glasgow next year.

Divisions over other questions – including carbon markets – were delayed until the next gathering.

What was agreed?

After two extra days and nights of negotiations, delegates finally agreed a deal that will see new, improved carbon cutting plans on the table by the time of the Glasgow conference next year.

All parties will need to address the gap between what the science says is necessary to avoid dangerous climate change, and the current state of play which would see the world go past this threshold in the 2030s.

Supported by the European Union and small island states, the push for higher ambition was opposed by a range of countries including the US, Brazil, India and China.

However a compromise was agreed with the richer nations having to show that they have kept their promises on climate change in the years before 2020.

What is the reaction?

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres said he was disappointed by the result.

"The international community lost an important opportunity to show increased ambition on mitigation, adaptation and finance to tackle the climate crisis," he said, quoted by AFP.