Trump ‘Apologises’ to Piers Morgan for Britain First Retweets

U.S. President Donald Trump took time out at the globalist World Economic Forum meeting in Davos, Switzerland, this week to speak in what has been billed as his first international television interview since taking the presidency, where he was called upon to apologise for his use of Twitter.

British breakfast television host Piers Morgan, who has long boasted of his friendship with President Trump, conducted the interview for ITV, which is due to air Sunday evening. Pressing the president for “just an apology” for his use of Twitter, Morgan was met with President Trump shaking his head and explaining he did not know that he had anything to apologise about.

WORLD EXCLUSIVE: In his first international interview since becoming US president, @realDonaldTrump says sorry for retweeting anti-Muslim videos. @piersmorgan

The full interview will air on Sunday 28 January at 10pm on @ITV and available on the @itvhub.

— Good Morning Britain (@GMB) January 26, 2018

In an advance preview of the programme, Morgan is shown repeatedly pressing the president to apologise for retweeting videos purporting to show acts of violence by Muslims, including men being thrown off the roof of a building and a statue of the Virgin Mary being smashed into pieces by laughing men.

Explaining why he had retweeted the videos in the first place, President Trump remarked: “It was done because I am a big believer in fighting radical Islamic terror. This was a depiction of radical Islamic terror.”

Trump Retweets Controversial ‘Britain First’ Activist Jayda Fransen

— Breitbart London (@BreitbartLondon) November 29, 2017

Stating that he had merely retweeted something another user had put on the Twitter platform and that it had not been a big deal in the United States, the president did seem to express some regret that the Tweets had hit the news in the United Kingdom, a country he plainly stated he is very fond of.

The president said: “The real me is somebody that loves Britain, loves the UK. I love Scotland — one of the biggest problems I have with winning [the presidency] is that I won’t be able to get back there so often. I would love to go there, as you know before this happened I was there a lot. A very special people, and a very special place.

“I don’t want to cause any difficulty for your country, that I can tell you.”

BREAKING: President Trump and PM May Talks at Davos: 'We Continue to Have That Really Special Relationship'

— Breitbart London (@BreitbartLondon) January 25, 2018

Pushed for an outright apology for his retweets — which made headlines in the United Kingdom and even triggered statements in the House of Commons — President Trump explained that he would disavow himself of the individuals responsible for the original tweets if they were “horrible people, horrible racist people.

“I would certainly apologise if you’d like me to do that, I know nothing about them. I don’t want to be involved with people [like that] but you’re telling me about these people, because I know nothing about these people.”

President Trump’s original retweets of videos uploaded by co-leader of British street protest movement Britain First Jayda Fransen in November 2017 led to British Prime Minister Theresa May speaking out against the president, apparently undoing previous work to build bridges between the United Kingdom and the Trump presidency.

.@Theresa_May, don’t focus on me, focus on the destructive Radical Islamic Terrorism that is taking place within the United Kingdom. We are doing just fine!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 30, 2017

Reacting to May’s comments against him, President Trump tweeted at her in November: “Don’t focus on me, focus on the destructive Radical Islamic Terrorism that is taking place within the United Kingdom. We are doing just fine!”

Fransen’s Twitter account was subsequently blocked by the social media platform in a so-called “purge” of right-wing users.

President Trump met with Prime Minister May at Davos this week, the first foreign leader he had talks with upon arriving at the globalist summit. In comments that echo his personal love for the United Kingdom, the President told waiting press after the meeting that “it’s an honour to be with Prime Minister May.

“We’ve had a great discussion – we’re on the same wavelength, I think, in every respect. And the prime minister and myself have had a really great relationship, although some people don’t necessarily believe that, but I can tell you it’s true.”

Follow Oliver Lane on Facebook, Twitter:Follow @Oliver_Laneor e-mail: olane[at]

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